Religions may regard themselves as forward thinking, with thought focused on an imminent immortality or a secure afterworld, however, this thinking is locked into time. By-standers notice that religions looking so far forward have a tendency to live in the past. Those religions are paid attention to about as well as flight attendants going through safety features on an airplane. But religion still has a job to do and it can be a practical guide to society when grounded on honest education and information.

One definition of religion from the New Webster’s Expanded Dictionary is; an acknowledgement of our obligation to God. In other words, it isn’t an acknowledgment of an obligation to static rituals and codes and creeds already outgrown by humanity.


Religion will continue to play an important role in life as it triggers advanced concepts of God and creation. But, communication of an advanced concept of God must be pertinent. Physical and psychological barriers are then broken through the proper use of applied knowledge, improving the very way human consciousness filters the world. It is important that religions recognize and participate in the now, today, otherwise the religion will no longer be recognized.


Although there is no one religion perfect and complete, it doesn’t mean religion is irrelevant. Religionists who staunchly battle the imaginary dilemma of a dying religion―by acknowledging an obligation to person, place, or thing―actually contribute to its death. However, to the contemporary thinker, religion is not going to die. Even in this new era of globalization there is evidence of religions acknowledging God, recognizing one another, and accommodating the interests of others.


Religion is relevant as discovery and understanding are given relevant manifestation. As our obligation to Truth, Life, and Love is honored, human consciousness transforms and accepts a practical forward mindedness living in the now.